Potential Future Temple Sites for the LDS (Mormon) Church

Predictions of possible future LDS temples sites can be made by examining several factors which often contribute to the decision by the First Presidency to construct of an LDS temple, namely:

1. Number of potential stakes and districts served
2. Distance from the nearest temple
3. Temple attendance and member activity rates
4. Perceived rates of future LDS Church growth
5. The duration of an LDS presence and local sustainability
6. Capacity and utilization of the nearest temple
7. Political stability and socioeconomic conditions

Each of these seven points are reviewed below. The first three points are the primary factors in the decision to build a temple whereas the last four points are secondary factors. Revelation is the ultimate factor determining whether a temple is announced thirukadaiyur temple.

1. Number of potential stakes and districts served

The numerical size of LDS membership and number of LDS congregations, stakes, and districts in a given area is one of the strongest predictors of where new LDS temples are constructed. Currently the average LDS temple services 22 stakes and five districts. 43 temples service nine or fewer stakes and 14 LDS temples service 50 or more stakes indicating that nearly 60% of temples have between 10 and 49 stakes in their respective temple districts. Temples are almost always constructed in cities which have multiple stakes.

2. Distance from the nearest LDS temple

LDS Church President Thomas S. Monson has iterated in recent General Conference addresses that the Church has focused on constructing temples closer and closer to its members. Mileage is not the only factor in ascertaining distance as a predicting factor for new temple announcements. Travel times and accessibility are also important variables taken into account for determining where new temples are built. Mode of transportation and the crossing of international boundaries are additional factors which fall under the distance variable.

3. Temple attendance and member activity rates

Church leaders have stressed that the Church will not build additional temples to stand empty. The number of temple recommend holders and active temple-going Latter-day Saints in a given area are heavily taken into account for constructing additional temples. Many nations which overall have low member activity rates and very few endowed members often experience significant delays in the construction of temples notwithstanding a sizable LDS population.

4. Perceived rates of future LDS Church growth

Decisions to construct some LDS temples appear to be partially motivated by forecasts for future LDS Church growth. Some predicted future Temple sites have taken future church growth trends into account.

5. The duration of an LDS presence and local sustainability

Some LDS temples have been built in older LDS communities notwithstanding few LDS members if additional factors favor the construction of a temple in a given location such as distance and member activity. The duration of an LDS presence has contributed to the construction of some temples in North America and Western Europe where stakes have operated for 50 years or more.

6. Capacity and utilization of the nearest LDS temple

The physical size of the temple building and its capacity to serve patrons has contributed to the construction of temples often in areas where temples are heavily utilized. Once a temple reaches capacity as defined by being unable to schedule additional endowment sessions and other ordinance work for temple-going members, another temple within the temple district may be constructed and often in a location which reduces travel times and has a large enough body of temple-attending members to merit the construction of a temple.

7. Political stability and socioeconomic conditions

Nations which experience the greatest stability and highest standards of living are often more likely to have LDS temples constructed than in nations which are politically unstable and have low living standards. Consequently wealthier and more stable nations with comparatively few Latter-day Saints and moderate activity rates often have one or several LDS temples whereas some poorer and less stable nations with moderate or high activity rates have no LDS temples despite the same number of total members.

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